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Field Punishment No.1 WORK



Field punishment is any form of punishment used against military personnel in the field; that is, field punishment does not require that the member be incarcerated in a military prison or reassigned to a punishment battalion. It may be formalised under a system of military justice and may be a sentence imposed in a court martial or similar proceedings




Field Punishment No.1



In English language contexts, "field punishment" refers specifically to Field Punishment Number One, which was used by the British Army between 1881 and 1923 and the armies of some other British Empire countries.


Field Punishment was introduced in 1881 following the abolition of flogging. It was a common punishment during World War I. A commanding officer could award field punishment for up to 28 days, while a court martial could award it for up to 90 days, either as Field Punishment Number One or Field Punishment Number Two.


Field Punishment Number One, often abbreviated to "F.P. No. 1", "No. 1 field", or even just "No. 1", consisted of the convicted man being placed in fetters and handcuffs or similar restraints and attached to a fixed object, such as a gun wheel or a fence post, for up to two hours per day. During the early part of World War I, the punishment was often applied with the arms stretched out and the legs tied together, giving rise to the nickname "crucifixion". This was applied for up to three days out of four, up to 21 days total. It was usually applied in field punishment camps set up for this purpose a few miles behind the front line, but when the unit was on the move it would be carried out by the unit itself. It has been alleged that this punishment was sometimes applied within range of enemy fire. During World War I Field Punishment Number One was issued by the British Army on 60,210 occasions.[1]


Although the 1914 Manual of Military Law specifically stated that Field Punishment should not be applied in such a way as to cause physical harm, in practice abuses were commonplace. For example, the prisoner would deliberately be placed in stress positions, with his feet not fully touching the ground, or the punishment would be applied in driving rain or snow. The New Zealand conscientious objector Archibald Baxter gave a particularly graphic account of his experience with Field Punishment No. 1 in his autobiography "We Will Not Cease". Baxter's story was dramatised in the 2014 TV movie Field Punishment No 1.[2][3]


In Field Punishment Number Two, the prisoner was placed in fetters and handcuffs but was not attached to a fixed object and was still able to march with his unit. This was a relatively tolerable punishment.


New Zealand servicemen that served in the Vietnam War with V Force (Vietnam Force) were not exempt from field punishment with some being locked inside large shipping containers for considerable time in the sweltering heat.[8]


The French Foreign Legion had its own field punishment. A legionnaire in the 1990s, Gareth Carins witnessed this punishment. While in training, a recruit called Schuhmann was caught deserting the training camp. Carins in the book Voices of the Foreign Legion: The French Foreign Legion in Its Own Words described how he saw Schuhmann slumped at the bottom of a flag pole: "His wrists had been bound together behind the flag pole, as had his ankles, so that it was impossible to stand up, and he was forced into a sort of kneeling position. I could see blood on the side of his face." In the book Mouthful of Rocks: Through Africa and Corsica in the French Foreign Legion former legionnaire and author Chris Jennings writes that recruits, as a form of punishment, had to dig graves in frozen soil, where the man would then spend the night, buried up to his neck.


There were two categories field punishment. Field punishment No. 1 consisted of heavy labouring duties, possibly being restrained in handcuffs or fetters, and being tied to a post or wheel. Field punishment No. 2 differed, in that the offender was not liable to be attached to a fixed object.


The most serious offenders in the military were subject to courts martial. Regimental and district courts martial dealt with minor crimes, while general and field general courts martial were more reserved for serious offences that could potentially result in a punishment of death.


Fraser Brown Michael Whalley Byron Coll Damien Avery Victoria Abbott Colin Moy Joseph Rye Jason Hodzelmans Tim Carlsen Richard Chapman Daniel Cleary Barry Duffield Coen Falke Robert Hartley Stephen Hunter Tama Jarman Eli Kent Phil Peleton Andrew Robertt Jordan Selwyn William Wallace


FIFA's threat of on-field punishment for players pushed World Cup teams to back down Monday and abandon a plan for their captains to wear armbands that were seen as a rebuke to host nation Qatar's human rights record.


It was the latest dispute that threatened to overshadow play on the field. Since being awarded the World Cup hosting rights in 2010, conservative Muslim Qatar has faced a raft of criticism, including its treatment of low-paid migrant workers and women and its suppression of free speech. It came under particular fire for its criminalization of homosexuality.


The risk of getting a second yellow, which would see a player sent off the field for the rest of the game and banned from the next, is particularly tricky in a tournament where teams play only three games before the knockout rounds begin.


The rules that governed the behaviour and treatment of the British army during the First World War was the 1881 Army Act that laid out the laws by which soldiers were to abide. The Act covered such minor infringements as poor appearance (being unshaven or having a dirty uniform), to the more serious issues of desertion, aiding the enemy or murder. There were a variety of possible punishments that could be handed out depending upon the infraction. Minor breaches could be punished by extra duties, exercise or, far worse in the minds of men who had been on prolonged service, loss of earnings or confinement to barracks.


If a soldier was judged to have committed a grave offence whilst in service they could face imprisonment, penal servitude (imprisonment with hard labour) or death. For a death sentence to be approved it had to be confirmed by the commander-in-chief in the theater. Over the course of the war, 3080 British, Dominion or Colonial soldiers were sentenced to death but most of those sentences were then reduced to imprisonment, field punishment or suspended. In total 346 soldiers were officially executed by firing squad.


Conspiracy to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute more than five kilograms ofcocaine and more than 280 grams of crack cocaine in violation of 21 U.S.C. 846 carries apossible punishment of no less than ten years and up to life imprisonment and a fine of up to $10million.


Conspiracy to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute more than 100 kilograms ofmarijuana in violation of 21 U.S.C. 846 carries a possible punishment of no less than five andup to forty years imprisonment and a fine of up to $5 million.


Distribution and possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine andmore than 280 grams of crack cocaine in violation of 21 U.S.C. 841(a)(1) carries a possiblepunishment of no less than ten years and up to life imprisonment and a fine of up to $10 million.


Distribution and possession with intent to distribute more than 500 grams of cocaine and morethan 28 grams of crack cocaine in violation of 21 U.S.C. 841(a)(1) carries a possiblepunishment of no less than five and up to forty years imprisonment and a fine of up to $5 million.


The use of a communication facility (telephone) in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime inviolation of 21 U.S.C. 843(b) carries a possible punishment of up to four years imprisonmentand up to a $250,000 fine.


Distribution or manufacturing of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a school in violationof 21 U.S.C. 860 carries a possible punishment of up to life imprisonment, and up to a $20million fine.


The possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime in violation of 18 U.S.C. 924(c) carries a possible punishment of no less than five years and up to life imprisonment, andup to a $250,000 fine.


Possession of a firearm by a felon in violation of 18 U.S.C. 922(g)(1), and disposing of afirearm to a felon in violation of 18 U.S.C. 922(d), carry a possible punishment of not morethan ten years imprisonment, and up to a $250,000 fine. 041b061a72


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